Andrew In

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Dean's Office (DO)

Dr. Andrew In, former dean of the College of Education (COE), passed away on May 26, 2009. Receiving his baccalaureate degree in education at the COE in 1941, In returned to the college in 1951 after earning his doctoral degree in secondary education at New York University. Over the next three decades, he would serve the college in many capacities - as principal of University High School, associate professor of education, director and chair of secondary education, professor of education, chair of curriculum and instruction, assistant dean for curriculum, associate dean of the college, and finally as dean of the college from 1980 to 1984. He helped to organize the COE Retirees Association and continued to be an active member of the COE Alumni Association (COEAA) until 2007.

Upon receiving the 1992 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the COEAA, In said, "I am most proud of the young men and women who were my students. It has been a joy to see them in the Department of Education and in other endeavors in the islands, the nation, and the world providing leadership and being good human beings."

Doris Ching, who was associate dean of education when In was dean, said, "Dean In was highly respected by the College of Education faculty who recognized his competence and integrity. He is the only university executive I have known whose faculty gave him a standing ovation when he was appointed dean and, likewise, a standing ovation when he retired from the position."

Fellow COEAA member, Violet Hara, called In a "Compassionate educator" and dear friend. She reflected on In's professional as well as personal impact, recalling "Dr. In was the Tai Chi instructor for the senior group at Mānoa Recreation Center, devoting every Friday morning to the program until his illness and resignation in May 2007. We miss him and are forever grateful for his dedication and legacy." The senior group continues to practice Tai Chi thanks to In.

"Dr. In will be remembered for his leadership and integrity in promoting the College of Education to high standards and success," added former COEAA President Thelma Nip. "We appreciate his unwavering support of the college's Alumni Association."

Melvin Lang, COE faculty from 1965-1998, expressed the difficulty of characterizing In, stating simply, "He was the most humane and trustworthy dean I worked with in my 33 years of service in the COE."

Professor of educational foundations emeritus, Bob Potter, joined the COE faculty in 1962 when In was chair of secondary education. He said, "We worked together closely until he retired as dean of the COE. He was always a skilled leader of the college and of the profession of teaching. I was privileged to enjoy his friendship for many years."

A friend and colleague of In's since 1959, Ralph Stueber was on the search committee that recommended the appointment of In as dean of the college. "My conviction was that Andy's service as associate dean had prepared him 'to hit the ground running' and that his deanship would symbolize the needed ethnic diversity of college leadership in our multicultural island society."

Bob Campbell, associate professor of science education, sought In's wisdom, judgment, and friendship for more than 50 years. Responding to In's invitation to join the Laboratory School as an instructor in the fall of 1956, Campbell described In as "one of the finest gentlemen" he ever met. "He was the obvious choice to become the chair of secondary education, then associate dean, and finally dean of the college. During his tenure in all three positions, the faculty grew in both numbers and capabilities, producing a wide variety of federal and state funded curriculum projects."

Before In's passing, Campbell and his wife, Brigitte, were able to visit with In and his wife, Jenny, as they had done so often over the years. "With Jenny's help, we navigated 52 years of mutual respect and left knowing we would soon lose a treasured friend. Auf wiedersehen, adieu, and goodbye to a gentleman and a scholar," Campbell concluded.