Diane Ramos, BEd Elementary Student and CESA Vice President

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Diane Ramos
“… this profession requires a strong drive, flexibility, and a positive mindset in an ever-changing environment.”
Hometown:

Kalihi, Hawai‘i

Department:

ITE Elementary

Degree:

BEd Elementary Education Student

What activities or organizations are you involved with on campus?
I am the Vice President of the College of Education Student Association (CESA) and a Regents and Presidential Scholar (RAPS).

What do you hope to accomplish as a CESA Executive Board Member?
Our team's goal is to revive our program and to build a strong foundation in which we hope to develop long-lasting relationships and experiences. Personally, with the support of my executive board members, I hope to bring awareness to our program and to connect our fellow peers to a variety networks and opportunities to grow as educators.

How did you become interested in the field of education?
As young as seven years old, I had an interest and love for teaching. My former 5th grade teacher was a key influencer towards this decision and interest in the field of education. Growing up, my parents were barely home due to work, and finding help with assignments was tough. I recall my 5th grade teacher always taking the time to work with me after school until I understood and mastered the concepts that we were learning. She exhibited traits of an effective teacher that I hope to mimic as an aspiring educator. These traits include being caring, positive, flexible, knowledgeable, and open-minded. She always made learning fun and made sure we challenged ourselves.

Briefly describe your journey to college.
In 2014, I graduated from Farrington High School. I decided to go to Leeward Community College (LCC) instead of going straight to a four-year university due to financial circumstances. During my time at LCC, I worked multiple jobs outside of the academic setting with my parents. I was also involved in many programs such as "Sulong Aral" where our goal was to help students of Filipino ancestry aim for higher education. I earned an AA in Liberal Arts, AA in Teaching, and Certificate of Competence in Special Education. I then transferred to UH Mānoa in the fall of 2017 to major in elementary education.

What advice would you give to incoming students who are considering Education as a major?
Education Week teachers Gladis Kersaint and Denisse Thompson shared:
Deciding to teach is an indication you are interested in joining an engaging, worthwhile, and yet challenging profession. Just as society has changed (i.e., technological advancements) and become more diverse, so too have schools, and they may be quite different from what you recall as a student.

That being said, going into an education profession is not the usual 8:00 AM-4:00 PM job, but it is a lifestyle. It is essential that you balance your workload and priorities. Times will get stressful, so do not forget to take a day off and take care of yourself. Your mental and physical health is very important! Also, know that the students in your classroom will know whether or not you are there just to fill space or if you really do have a passion to be there. If you are considering being an education major, know that this profession requires a strong drive, flexibility, and a positive mindset in an ever-changing environment. We need teachers who are committed not only to teach but to inspire, challenge and cater to the needs of our students who come from a variety of backgrounds. As an educator, you are an agent of change, you have the power to influence the future.

What are your future plans?
After graduation in May 2019, I hope to find a teaching position within a school in my community or in a community that requires more support. Other plans include traveling to Europe and Asia, starting a side business (e.g., Teachers Pay Teachers, craft projects, catering), and going back to school to earn a Master's Degree in Educational Psychology.