COE Faculty and Staff > Curriculum Studies > Julie Kaomea

  • Julie Kaomea

    Professor

    Department(s)

    • Curriculum Studies

    Degree(s)

    • 1999 PhD Education University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa
    • 1995 MEd Elementary Education University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa
    • 1990 Teaching Certificate University of California, Berkeley
    • 1989 BA Psychology Stanford University

    Area(s) of Interest

    • Decolonizing Research Methodologies
    • Indigenous Education
    • Native Hawaiian Education

    Contact Information

    Office Phone

    (808) 956-3994

    Office

    Everly 227B

    Email

    thirugna@hawaii.edu

    Homepage

    No home page provided.

    Curriculum Vitae

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    Scholarly Works

      Book Chapters

    • Au, K., & Kaomea, J. L. (2009). Reading comprehension and diversity in historical perspective: Literacy, power, and Native Hawaiians. In S. Israel & G. Duffy (Eds.), Handbook of research on reading comprehension (pp. 1197–1230). New York: Routledge.
    • Journal Articles

    • Halagao, P., & Kaomea, J. L. (2017). On my honor: Creating space for thinking and living Girl Scouts differently in (post)colonial Hawai‘i. Gender and Education, 1–16.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2016). Qualitative analysis as ho‘oku‘iku‘i or bricolage: Teaching emancipatory Indigenous research in postcolonial Hawai‘i. Qualitative Inquiry, 22(2), 99–106.
    • Wurdeman-Thurston, K., & Kaomea, J. L. (2015). Fostering culturally relevant literacy instruction: Lessons from a Native Hawaiian classroom. Language Arts, 92(6), 424–435.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2014). Education for elimination in nineteenth-century Hawai‘i: Settler colonialism and the Native Hawaiian chiefs’ children’s boarding school. History of Education Quarterly, 54(2), 123–144.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2013). Lab Coats or Trench Coats? Detective Sleuthing as an Alternative to Scientifically Based Research in Indigenous Educational Communities. Qualitative Inquiry, online first, online first.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2012). Reconceptualizing Indigenous Parent Involvement in Early Educational Settings: Lessons from Native Hawaiian Preschool Families. The International Indigenous Policy Journal, 3(4), Article 4.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2011). Hawaiian Math for a Sustainable Future: Envisioning a Conceptual Framework for Rigorous and Culturally Relevant 21st-Century Elementary Mathematics Education. Hūlili: Multidisciplinary Research on Hawaiian Well-Being, 7, 289–306.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2009). Contemplating Kuleana: Relfections on the Rights and Responsibilities of Nonindigenous Participates in Programmes for Indigenous Education. AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, 5 (2), 78–99.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2009). Indigenous Education for All? A Metaphorical Counterstory. International Critical Childhood Policy Studies Journal, 2 (1), 109–121.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2006). Nā wāhine mana: A postcolonial reading of classroom discourse on the imperial rescue of oppressed Hawaiian women. Pedagogy, Culture and Society, 14(3), 329–348.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2005). Indigenous studies in the elementary curriculum: A cautionary Hawaiian example. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 36(1), 24–42.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2005). Reflections of an “always already” failing Native Hawaiian mother: Deconstructing colonial discourses on indigenous childrearing and early childhood education. Hūlili: Multidisciplinary Research on Hawaiian Well-Being, 2(1), 77–95.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2003). Reading erasures and making the familiar strange: Defamiliarizing methods for research in formerly colonized and historically oppressed communities. . Educational Researcher, 32(2), 14–25.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2001). Dilemmas of an indigenous academic: A Native Hawaiian story. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 2(1), 67–82.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2000). A curriculum of aloha? Colonialism and tourism in Hawai‘i’s elementary textbooks. Curriculum Inquiry, 30(3), 319–344.
    • Presentations

    • Kaomea, J. L. (2016, May). Teaching emancipatory research methods to Indigenous researchers in Native Hawaiian and Indigenous educational communities. Presented at annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, Honolulu, Hawai'i.
    • Halagao, P., & Kaomea, J. L. (2015, April). On my honor: Creating a space for thinking and living Girls Scouts differently in (post)colonial Hawai‘i. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, Illinois.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2014, May). Elimination and survivance in the 19th century Native Hawaiian chiefs’ children’s boarding school. Presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, Austin, Texas.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2014, May). Education for elimination in nineteenth-century Hawai‘i: Settler colonialism and the Native Hawaiian chiefs’ children’s boarding school. Presented at the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education, Honolulu, Hawai'i.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2013, April). Lab coats or trenchcoats? Detective sleuthing as an alternative to scientifically-based research in indigenous educational communities. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, California.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2012, April). Early education for extinction in post(colonial) Hawai‘i: The genocidal legacy of the Hawaiian chiefs’ children’s residential boarding school. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Vancouver, Canada.
    • Kaomea, J. L. (2009, April). Broken trust in Hawaiian family-school relations: A genealogy of the present. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, California.